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      02-28-2012, 05:51 PM   #1
Stuart@BMRAutowerkes
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DIY: N54 HPFP Replacement

My HPFP needed changing, here is my DIY.

Disclaimer: you do this at your own risk. Professional installation is encouraged.
Estimated time: 6hours* (highly recommended to let the car cool down overnight. I basically removed everything besides the fuel pump during the night, then the next morning removed the fuel pump itself. This will let the pressure in the fuel lines subside a bit plus will reduce your chances of getting burnt)

Tools you will need:
8mm socket
10mm socket
11mm socket
5mm hex (short Ė i.e youíll be using this in a tight *******
5mm hex (long Ė youíll be using this to reach past other obtrusions)
T20 torx
T25 torx
E12 female torx
17mm OE spanner
18mm OE spanner
24mm OE spanner
Flathead screwdriver
Microfibre towel / shop rag


As of Feb 2012 the latest and greatest fuel pump part number is: 13517616446

You can order it from Tischer here

OK the HPFP replacement can be broken down into around 9 steps of varying difficulty:
1. Removing microfilter & cowl (very easy)
2. Removing airbox (very easy)
3. Removing chargepipe (easy)
4. Removing throttle body (moderate)
5. Removing engine cover (easy)
6. Removing intake manifold (moderate)
7. Disconnecting fuel lines (easy)
8. Removing fuel pump (moderate)
9. Putting it all back together


Step 1: Removing microfilter & cowl
Tools needed: 8mm socket & flathead screwdriver

- Unclip the small black cover on both the driver side and passenger side and wiggle the rubber grommets free from the cover.
- Unscrew the 6 x 8mm bolts holding the microfilter down (red arrows)
- Unscrew the 2 x 8mm bolts holding the cowl in place (blue arrows)
- Disconnect the ambient temperature sensor by unclipping it (green star)
- If your car is fitted with an alarm, disconnect the alarm sensor (yellow star)
- Use your flat head screwdriver to unclip the part of the cowl that attaches to the cabling running through your engine bay (green arrow)



Step 2: Removing airbox
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver

Assuming you still have your OEM airbox, use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the 7 metal tabs holding the lid in place.
Then using your flathead screwdriver, unscrew the two collars holding piping in place (indicated by the red arrows)
The airbox should now just be held in place by three rubber grommets on the underside of the airbox, gentle rocking back and forth combined with a bit of a yank should free the airbox.
Now, disconnect the vacuum hose fitting indicated in the second pic in the red circle. Simply squeeze the sides together and lift up.




Step 3:Removing chargepipe
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver, T20 torx (and in my case 8mm socket)

I have an ER chargepipe, so if youíre still OEM, thereís another DIY for removal.
Unscrew the collar (blue circle) with a flathead screwdriver, unbolt the collar (red circle) with an 8mm socket. Itís likely your car will be different, but itís not rocket science youíll be able to figure it out
Then, up near the Ďtop endí of the charge pipe we need to remove an electrical sensor with our T20 (2 screws) indicated by the red arrows, and then use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the clip holding the chargepipe to the intake manifold. Wiggle the sensor out... if your chargepipe has a BOV, slide the vacuum line off the back of it. No pic right now but Iíll show you one later.





Step 4: Removing throttle body
Tools needed: 10mm socket

There are 4 x 10mm fasteners holding the throttle body to the intake manifold. Use your socket to undo them. There is also a vacuum line leading out of the back of the throttle body, squeeze and rotate this and it should come off. The last sensor is fairly obvious, however I couldnít get mine undone. If you can, great, remove the throttle body altogether and keep it in a safe clean place. If youíre like me and canít get it undone, just lay the throttle body to the side of the engine bay Ė thereís plenty of slack in the cable, and cover it with a cloth of some sort to prevent any debris from contaminating it.





Step 5: Removing engine cover
Tools needed: TBA

4 fasteners. Undo them. Lift the cover off and remove gently. Done.
Note: some cars will have a crankcase breather line... mine didnít so I canít show you pics on it. If yours doesnít have it, it will just be a plug like in the pic below. If you do have it, I donít think itís too hard to disconnect.




Step 6: Removing intake manifold
Tools needed: T20 torx and 11m socket

Letís start with the intake manifold sensor, use your T20 torx to undo the 2 screws holding the sensor in place .


Then slide the wiring harness junction box off the bracket on the underside of the intake manifold.


There is an oil pressure sensor switch up near the oil filter (red star), so use your fingers/flat head screwdriver to undo this, keep the clip safe and lay the sensor to the side.
Grab your 11mm socket and undo 7 x 11mm fasteners holding the intake manifold to the engine block. In this photo Iíve marked the obvious ones with a red arrow, but you shouldnít have trouble finding the others.


Removing the manifold itself can get a bit tricky due to space constraints... the piping down the back near the firewall will require a bit of a tug and pull away for the manifold to slide out. Once itís clear though, itís smooth sailing.



Your engine should now look like this


Step 7: Disconnecting fuel line
Tools needed: 24mm spanner, 11mm and 17mm spanner (could be 18, I canít remember), E12 female torx.

This is probably the most hazardous part of the install. The fuel is stored under quite great pressure... however I left the car overnight so when I undid it there were zero dramas, about a teaspoon of fuel dropped out and I had a microfiber there to catch it. For safety sake, undo the fuel line nuts very slowly and wear goggles/protective clothing.
Red circle: use your 24mm spanner to unscrew this fuel line pressure sensor
Green circle: unclips
Blue circle: E12 torx Ė undo this fastener
Yellow star: Iíve forgotten to take a good picture, but this is where youíll find the two fuel line nuts, theyíre pretty obvious. Undo them with a 17 (or 18mm Ė canít remember) spanner. Do the left one first. Move the fuel line out of the way.



Next, use your 11mm socket to undo this fastener (red circle).
Use your 17mm spanner to again undo the fuel line nuts (blue circles). Move the fuel line out of the way.



Step 8: Removing fuel pump
Tools needed: 5mm hex keys (long and short) and a microfibre towel
Now onto the fuel pump. There are 3 x 5mm hex fasteners holding the fuel pump in place.
In this pic, ignore that I havenít removed the fuel lines yet, the pics are just a bit out of order...
You can see the red circle where you will need to use your 5mm hex key to undo the nuts... for the Ďback oneí i.e. closest to the engine block, use the long hex key and go around the fuel pump. Youíll figure it out.



Once the fuel pump starts to become loose you can gently wiggle it out... a bit of oil and fuel will dribble out here. Have your MF handy to clean it up. In my case, barely any came out.

Letís compare old and new...


Where the fuel pump used to be. This is where the oil will dribble out to. Iíve since cleaned it up.



Step 9.

And youíre done (well almost). Put everything back together in a similar fashion to how it was disassembled... youíll figure it out.
The fuel line nuts should be torqued to 30nm but if you donít have a torque wrench just do them tight, without applying excess force. Last thing you will want is to bend/break your fuel line.
Start her up Ė there will be a long crank as the fuel line repressurises and fuel goes through the HPFP for the first time, but then you should be good to go.

Whenever I removed a screw/nut/fastener I wrote it down just in case I forgot where to put it, here's my chart if it helps you:

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      02-28-2012, 05:54 PM   #2
Dackelone
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Thanks for posting this AWESOME DIY!!!
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      02-28-2012, 05:58 PM   #3
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Wow thats great! Thanks!
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      02-28-2012, 07:19 PM   #4
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Awesome! Doesn't look too bad, just a lot of steps
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      02-28-2012, 07:36 PM   #5
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      02-29-2012, 07:20 AM   #6
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Sub'd... hopefully I'll never have to see use this thread, but you never know. :-)

Nice work BMR! I'm sure many 1addicts will use this thread in the years to come,definitely helping to make it a quicker process.

ps: reserve a post or two on this page in case you need to update after a year or so. I've heard the OP gets locked to changes after a certain period of time.

pps: sticky this thing!!
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      02-29-2012, 07:55 AM   #7
Stuart@BMRAutowerkes
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Good point woosh,

post reserved.

Thanks for all the positive feedback guys
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      02-29-2012, 08:38 AM   #8
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quick side note, how do you like your ER charge pipe/bov?
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      02-29-2012, 09:49 AM   #9
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Fantastic photos (great macro mode), great depictions added, and very good descriptions...

I vote you (re)make all the DIYs from now on. Get to work.
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      02-29-2012, 10:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmroxm5 View Post

Thanks for all the positive feedback guys

bmroxm5 - did you happen to peek down your intake valves? Any carbon buildup>? Photos??? Seems like replacing a HPFP and doing a intake valve carbon cleanup has a lot of labor over lap.
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      02-29-2012, 11:51 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dackelone View Post
bmroxm5 - did you happen to peek down your intake valves? Any carbon buildup>? Photos??? Seems like replacing a HPFP and doing a intake valve carbon cleanup has a lot of labor over lap.
My thoughts exactly.
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      02-29-2012, 04:02 PM   #12
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Thanks for such a super job of this DIY. This is the kind of info we need on this forum.
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      02-29-2012, 06:13 PM   #13
Stuart@BMRAutowerkes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan.ferguson View Post
quick side note, how do you like your ER charge pipe/bov?
ER Charge pipe is great, quality piece of work and highly recommended

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaeryan View Post
Fantastic photos (great macro mode), great depictions added, and very good descriptions...

I vote you (re)make all the DIYs from now on. Get to work.
Haha yeh if only I had the time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dackelone View Post
bmroxm5 - did you happen to peek down your intake valves? Any carbon buildup>? Photos??? Seems like replacing a HPFP and doing a intake valve carbon cleanup has a lot of labor over lap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by flzrider View Post
My thoughts exactly.
Yeah! I had a look down my intake valves... there was definitely carbon build up (was hard to get a good pic due to not much lighting inside the valve lol but I'll maybe later post up the pics I tried to take...
It wasn't as bad as some people's I have seen, but definitely a light to moderate black coating on the valves.

I'm not sure how to clean the intake valves though? The carbon buildup is seriously caked on and I think it needs to be sand blasted?
Perhaps you could use a wirebrush or something.. but all that will do is dislodge the carbon into the cylinders? Unless you vacuum it out.. anyway as you can see I'm not really sure how to clean the intake valves.

If someone lets me know then I will do another DIY

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Fasst1 View Post
Thanks for such a super job of this DIY. This is the kind of info we need on this forum.
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      02-29-2012, 06:54 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaeryan View Post
Fantastic photos (great macro mode), great depictions added, and very good descriptions...

I vote you (re)make all the DIYs from now on. Get to work.
Excellent write!... hope I never have to do this but if I do, it will be thanks to your DIY.
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      02-29-2012, 07:00 PM   #15
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The best way to clean the valves is with a walnut blaster. Sand blasting would get sand where it shouldn't be. I just used a gun barrel cleaning brass brush, a shop vac, some dental pics, lots of carb cleaner and one hour per set of valves to clean all the crud. It makes a big difference if you have a lot of buildup. Just make sure the valves are closed then fill up the chamber with carb cleaner and wait a bit before you go to town with the brush. It takes lots of patients and working at odd angles.

Nice writeup BTW
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      03-01-2012, 11:14 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmroxm5 View Post

Yeah! I had a look down my intake valves... there was definitely carbon build up (was hard to get a good pic due to not much lighting inside the valve lol but I'll maybe later post up the pics I tried to take...
It wasn't as bad as some people's I have seen, but definitely a light to moderate black coating on the valves.

I'm not sure how to clean the intake valves though? The carbon buildup is seriously caked on and I think it needs to be sand blasted?
Perhaps you could use a wirebrush or something.. but all that will do is dislodge the carbon into the cylinders? Unless you vacuum it out.. anyway as you can see I'm not really sure how to clean the intake valves.

If someone lets me know then I will do another DIY




Harbor Freight sells three different walnut blasters. They work well in removing carbon buildup and are very affordable.

A freind fo mine used SeaFoam to clean his intake valves on his RS4. He tore off the intake manifold... then spray down the valves twice per day (AM and PM) over three days. After awhile the carbon absorbs the SeaFoam and gets softer. He then used some detal picks and scrapers to remove the builtup carbon. He also used a small vacuum to remove any left over bits.

Afterwards... he said he noticed his RS4 engine really pulled much better at high rpms than it did before the cleaning. He thought maybe 40 Hp gain, bc of how much buildup he had on his intake valves.
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      06-06-2012, 02:07 PM   #17
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