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      09-05-2016, 12:07 AM   #1
$iriu$black
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How do you bleed your brakes with a Motive/Schwaben bleeder?

I've done it earlier and did it with a pressure bleeder. I filled the bleeder with the fluid, took a bit out of the reservoir, pressurised the bleeder, capped the reservoir and then bled from rears to fronts.

I have read some people use the bleeder just for pressurising the system, how do you exactly do this? They say cleanup is nonexistent as it is "dry." All I know is this technique does not require filling the bleeder, but the reservoir instead. I wanna try to rebleed again tomorrow, maybe trying this technique.

Do you guys think this is better, maybe just more time consuming or riskier in putting air in the system? I feel I'd rather do the"wet" method and use the remaining 1L can that I already opened to top off earlier. This way it doesn't go to waste as I know they are not meant to be stored for long periods.

Thank you.
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      09-05-2016, 10:50 AM   #2
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Personally think removing the pump and filling the reservoir every time it gets low offsets any time saved. Plus you risk pushing air into the system and having to start over. It take like 2 minutes and a paper towel to clean the pump once you're done.
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      09-05-2016, 03:59 PM   #3
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If you fill the reservoir nearly full and just pump the bleeder to provide pressure, you could probably bleed with no issues. But, you've got to keep a keen eye on the reservoir and make sure you are only taking a small amount from each caliper. Take too much and you've got air and will need to do a more extensive bleed/flush to be sure you got it out.

I can see doing it you know you've got air near near the calipers (i.e. track day). If it's part of a normal maintenance routine however, for the time involved, I'd just as soon put fresh fluid in the car (flush versus bleed) since it's not that much more intensive.
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      09-06-2016, 10:29 AM   #4
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I did mine this spring with the motive bleeder and 'dry' method. It was my first time bleeding brakes and it was super easy. My brake pedal feels noticeably firmer now.

Suck out as much old fluid as you can from the reservoir first with a turkey baster, then fill to the top line with new fluid. Pressurize the system and bleed as normal. When the fluid starts to get close to the bottom line in the reservoir, just depressurize and refill it, repeat. I did pump the brake pedal lightly a few times to speed things up.

It has been recommended to have your receiving bottle on the other end raised up above the level of your bleeder valve to prevent any air bubbles from traveling back into the system. I used some wire to hook it up onto the spring.
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      09-11-2016, 07:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by $iriu$black
I've done it earlier and did it with a pressure bleeder. I filled the bleeder with the fluid, took a bit out of the reservoir, pressurised the bleeder, capped the reservoir and then bled from rears to fronts.

I have read some people use the bleeder just for pressurising the system, how do you exactly do this? They say cleanup is nonexistent as it is "dry." All I know is this technique does not require filling the bleeder, but the reservoir instead. I wanna try to rebleed again tomorrow, maybe trying this technique.

Do you guys think this is better, maybe just more time consuming or riskier in putting air in the system? I feel I'd rather do the"wet" method and use the remaining 1L can that I already opened to top off earlier. This way it doesn't go to waste as I know they are not meant to be stored for long periods.

Thank you.
Bav Auto made a DIY vid on the E92 M3. They use either this exact bleeder or another manufacturers that is the same. 135i is the same procedure, YouTube it.
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      09-23-2016, 08:31 AM   #6
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The main advantage of the dry method is to avoid getting moisture in the brake fluid. If you do it wet and really clean the tank on the motive well you should be OK. But if you leave any brake fluid in it, it will pick up moisture and your next fill will start with brake fluid which may be worse than you are flushing.
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