BMW 1 Series Coupe Forum / 1 Series Convertible Forum (1M / tii / 135i / 128i / Coupe / Cabrio / Hatchback) (BMW E82 E88 128i 130i 135i)
 





 

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      03-09-2018, 04:21 AM   #23
spxxx
Boost
spxxx's Avatar
442
Rep
2,661
Posts

Drives: 135i M-Sport
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Valley of Silicon, CA - United States

iTrader: (7)

Quote:
Originally Posted by brando1 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbnks2 View Post
Bend your heat shields out on the front calipers so they scoop air... all the way to the control arm. Or, get some brake ducting. Getting heat under control and running some REAL race pads will be far more beneficial than dropping $4k on a BBK.
I'm going to try to the heat shields. This is the first time in 5 outings I cooked the brakes, and pads are a must.

I don't think I can do the brake ducts, pretty sure my overkill dual oil coolers could get in the way.
Two options without frontal room for ducts...
1. try the Porsche gt3rs brake ducts that connect to the control arms

2. run two naca ducts from the undertray panel up to 2-3 inch aeronautical aluminum flanges riveted to the dust shields near the center of the rotor. superr cheap and would work great

copy hard motorsport basically
__________________
E82 1M Clone "Racecar"
E46 M3 "Driveway Car"
E92 M3 "Street Car"
Appreciate 0
      03-09-2018, 02:01 PM   #24
brando1
New Member
6
Rep
13
Posts

Drives: 2008 135i
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: south florida

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by spxxx View Post
Two options without frontal room for ducts...
1. try the Porsche gt3rs brake ducts that connect to the control arms

2. run two naca ducts from the undertray panel up to 2-3 inch aeronautical aluminum flanges riveted to the dust shields near the center of the rotor. superr cheap and would work great

copy hard motorsport basically
DAMN.
Thats strong. Thanks for the recommendation, I can't wait to offer this solution to my mechanic.
Appreciate 0
      03-09-2018, 02:24 PM   #25
Real Dodger
Always exploring.....
Real Dodger's Avatar
United_States
3928
Rep
4,816
Posts

Drives: 135i DCT
Join Date: May 2017
Location: McKinney TX

iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2012 135  [5.00]
a thought hit me this morning. Buy a used trailer, and rent a truck to haul your car to the track. My wife's cousin did something similar with his 2008 135. Of course, he had to trailer it because it wasn't street legal.
__________________
praeses decurrit sicut puella
Appreciate 0
      03-12-2018, 03:24 PM   #26
ajsmithvmi
Professional Hack
United_States
34
Rep
222
Posts

Drives: 2009 135i
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: St Louis

iTrader: (4)

Quote:
Originally Posted by spxxx View Post
Two options without frontal room for ducts...
1. try the Porsche gt3rs brake ducts that connect to the control arms

2. run two naca ducts from the undertray panel up to 2-3 inch aeronautical aluminum flanges riveted to the dust shields near the center of the rotor. superr cheap and would work great

copy hard motorsport basically
This is what I did. You'll have to run the ducting below the LCA's and sway bar, up behind them and then around the strut.
Appreciate 0
      03-12-2018, 08:55 PM   #27
bm49
Enlisted Member
23
Rep
38
Posts

Drives: 2008 135i manual, 2010 320d
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Canberra. Australia

iTrader: (0)

Wink Re: 135i brake problems

When building my 2008 for touring car-type racing I studied all the posts about the lack of durability when the factory Brembo brakes are fitted with competition pads and used hard. It struck me as odd that the 135i's had this problem whereas the E90 335i and M3 models did not despite the latter being equipped with the technically inferior single-piston sliding calipers. A comparison of the respective specifications led me to the conclusion that the 135's problems was likely to be largely caused by its rotors being 4mm thinner (26mm vs 30mm for the 335i/M3). I believe that the smaller air gap between the rotor faces results in a greater transfer of the heat generated when competition-type pads are used to brake harder and more frequently.

As my car is also a daily driver (front cage and race seat removed) and my racing budget is small I was reluctant to go down the after market BBK route. I was also conscious of wanting to maintain a setup that is road legal, offers relatively cheap replacement costs and avoids wheel fitment problems. To test my theory I purchased some used 335i front rotors/calipers for $US 50 per side plus freight. This is a straight bolt-on and comes with the bonus of a 10mm increase in rotor diameter to 348mm. In relation to the hydraulic side of things there is a difference of just under 5% in piston area that causes a slight increase in pedal effort but no change in pedal height. As the rear brakes do not work as hard as the fronts I fitted a set of Race Brakes stainless steel caliper pistons and their silicone seals/dust boots. In conjunction with some uprated brake fluid and a set of race pads (usually Pagid RS29) I have now been racing (not track days) hard for nearly 3 years without any performance or durability problems or supplementary aids like cooling hoses. A small improvement to be done soon will be the replacement of the rubber bushes used in the sliding calipers with brass items to reduce uneven pad wear. I should mention that the Pagids work well even in Winter lows of -7c and only get slightly noisy after a lot of road use in the 2-3 month break between race seasons. At some tracks the summer air temp reaches the low 40's c.)
In summary this has proved to be a cheap solution that works well and provides easy access to either factory or after-market rotors. The only downside for some is the loss of the bling associated with the Brembo calipers compared to the dull industrial look of the 335i caliper.

Last edited by bm49; 03-12-2018 at 09:18 PM.
Appreciate 3
      03-27-2018, 10:33 AM   #28
brando1
New Member
6
Rep
13
Posts

Drives: 2008 135i
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: south florida

iTrader: (0)

Well, gentlemen, all of your advice has helped immensely.
The car made it to Sebring without the group buy wheels, and better tires. Still waitiing.
However, the other things performed flawlessly.
The rear subframe bushings fixed the handling in the rear. It is definately stiffer but not what I would consider uncomfortable, and I got the solid ones from Turner.
Dinan camber plates.
This is my first foray into modifying suspension for track duty. These fixed the chewing up of the outside of my tires. The car feels a little more nervous at high speeds, but seems to turn in a little better, and it's easier to keep my line.
Handling wise the whole package just seems significantly more connected, albeit a little more nervous.
Brakes.
Still on the factory rotors.
Hawk HPS Plus pads. They bite much more aggressively then stock. The do squeak a little bit though.I also added the stainless steel brake lines. Under recommendation from one of the guys here, I also bent back the heat shields as much as was possible without rubbing.
Not once did I overheat them. And they never felt like they pushed beyond their capabilities.

Overall the car preformed better in almost 4 hours of track time, as opposed to 1 hour of track time, before this round of mods.

Sebring is a bitch of a track to learn. 17 turns and 3.7 miles long. I was used to hammering the car around PBIR, and nowing exactly what was coming up.
Not here.
This was my first experience in this car, where I felt like I was holding the car back, not the other way around. I was also thrown off having an instructor in the car. I haven't had anybody tell me how to drive in, shit, almost 26 years.
Obviously it helped, but boy did it throw me off my game. I learned a lot, but I just could not get used to somebody talking in my ear. I missed my music, and the ability to slowly adjust my line, without input.
I will go back again.
Next will hopefully be the apex wheels, and a more aggressive tire.
The most important thing at this point is getting out there on track more often and fixing the biggest weak point in this equation. The getting older, biological matter behind the steering wheel.
Appreciate 1
BimmerAg373.00

      08-20-2018, 08:26 PM   #29
SleepingBMW
Private
United_States
35
Rep
76
Posts

Drives: 135i
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Midwest

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Datka View Post
This car in stock form is undriveable on the track, if you are a fast driver.
1. Limp mode-You need to search this forum to address the issue.
2. Understeer- can be fixed by installing camber plates, wider rims/wider tires, m3 control arms. This is a minimum to address the issue.
3. Body roll-good coilovers, bigger front sway bar, m3 rear subframe bushings.
This is just to get you started and enjoy your track days, but to really make this car going there is a lot more.
Takes a lot of $$$ to make it competitive, that's why we don't see too many of our cars in club racing.
Glad to see this is not just my opinion. I learned to track it and its shortcomings became very apparent. I knew I was going pretty fast because I could keep up with some new M3s in my group but i felt I was rolling and scrubbing speed so easily.

I'm not sure in my HPDE context I will deviate from stock and I'm sure I'm not maxing out stock yet anyway but I agree.
Appreciate 0
Post Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:31 PM.




1addicts
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST